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Marvi Masud

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Ever wonder how you’ve become the person you are today? The truth lies in the concept of psychodynamic theory. Your past experiences, relationships, and influences have all contributed to your personality in some way or the other. In this post, we will discuss a number of psychodynamic theory examples to help you develop a better understanding of personality development from a psychological perspective. What is the Psychodynamic Theory of Personality? The psychodynamic theory is a collection of different psychological theories that together contribute to the psychodynamic perspective. These theories mainly emphasize on how one’s individual personality is an amalgamation of early childhood experiences and unconscious desires and impulses. Famous theorists such as Erik Erikson, Sigmund Freud and Alfred Alder have contributed to the psychodynamic theory. Sigmund Freud’s Psychodynamic Theory Sigmund Freud is among the most influential names in psychology. The Austrian neurologist is considered as the pioneers…

There is a list of character traits found in creative professionals, that are unique, and sets them apart from others around them. There’s something different about them. They’re dreamers – the rebels who can’t contain their ideas in a cage. Some are expressive while others like to keep a low profile. They say creativity is an innate ability that can’t be acquired. Instead, it can be honed and nurtured over time but the truth is, the best ideas come easily to some more than others. Most of these people possess a similar list of character traits that distinguish them from others. List of Unique Character Traits in Creative Professionals Below is a list of character traits that are highly associated with creative individuals. 1. They’re okay with being different Creative minds aren’t exactly familiar with the term ‘conformity’. They’re okay with being different and celebrate their quirkiness.…

Positive reinforcement examples are important to understand the concept that was first coined by B.F Skinner while working on operant conditioning. To give you a high-level idea, positive reinforcement is a reward-based system that aims to encourage positive behaviour. This method is also one of the most important concepts in behaviour analysis. In this quick guide, we’ll discuss the definition, outcomes, and examples of positive reinforcement. What Is Positive Reinforcement? Positive reinforcement is an integral part of operant conditioning. In positive reinforcement, a stimulus is reinforced to encourage a certain behaviour, in hopes that it’ll occur again in the future. This favourable behaviour is encouraged via a reward, event or outcome to ensure the response is strengthened. Unlike negative reinforcement, positive reinforcement occurs when something is added to the equation. To help you understand this better, we’ll be discussing some basic positive reinforcement examples below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ9Ywl3iCpc Positive Reinforcement…

If you’ve heard about what classical conditioning is. It’s the process of learning a new behaviour via an association. In this blog, we’ll discuss some awesome classical conditioning examples that’ll help you gain a better idea of the subject. Classical Conditioning in Marketing In marketing, classical conditioning can be used to promote aggressive learning that helps customers associate certain behaviours or feelings with brands or products. Classical conditioning involves learning a new behaviour after developing a certain association with the stimuli. Many brands use this approach to associate their products with an action or emotion that might help the product sell and increase revenue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ua1nW5n8src Classical Conditioning Examples in Daily Life To help you develop a better understanding, let’s discuss a few classical conditioning examples in daily life. Example 1 The advertisements you’ve seen on billboards and television typically feature classical conditioning. Most companies use…

To understand what are Erik Erikson’s stages of development and the concept thereof, we need to embrace the fact that each person has his or her own unique identity. When you dive a little deeper, you’ll understand that a person’s identity is composed of various personality traits. These traits can be classified as positive and negative and vary from person to person. In short, as humans, we possess many characteristics that sculpt our personality into what we are today. This entire process can be examined more clearly by studying Erikson’s stages of development. Who was Erik Erikson? Erik Erikson was a German-born developmental psychologist who eventually immigrated to American. The 20th-century psychologist is most famous for the concept of identity crisis and for the theory of psychosocial development. Erikson was highly influenced by Sigmund Freud and worked hard to carry forward his works in human psychology. Erikson’s stages…

Have you ever considered the differences between psychiatry vs. psychology , or have you assumed them to be the same (or similar?). You’re not alone. Psychologists and psychiatrists may work together for their patient’s well-being by offering their distinct professional skills. But, while most people assume that psychiatrists and psychologist are interchangeable terms, this is far from reality. The primary differences between the two areas of specialties mainly concern educational background, practice, salary, and training. In this blog, we will highlight the difference between psychiatry vs. psychology. Differences between Psychologists and Psychiatrists Before we dive into the details, it’s crucial you familiarize yourself with the basics. First off, psychiatrists are professionally trained medical doctors that are qualified to prescribe medication. Psychiatrists have to go to med school and typically deal with medication management. It’s also worth noting that the educational path for psychiatrists is more complex when compared…

Remember when we discussed operant conditioning? One of the most important concepts discussed by the American psychologist B.F. Skinner was negative reinforcement. While many mistaken negative reinforcement for punishment, it is definitely not the same thing! In this post, we’ll explain what it is along with 12 negative reinforcement examples that can help you understand the concept better. What is Negative Reinforcement? punishment procedure. In fact, it can cleverly be used to decrease the frequency of bad behaviour. Below is a list of negative reinforcement examples that illustrate negative reinforcement in action. 12 Negative Reinforcement Examples To help you gain a better understanding about its outcomes, here are a few negative reinforcement examples: Example 1 Suppose a young boy named Max dislikes eating vegetables. Every time his parents bring a plate of vegetables forward, Max screams out in anguish. Because his parents can’t tolerate the screaming, they resort…

One of the most widely known theories of human behaviour includes operant conditioning. To date, psychology is considered as one of the most interesting disciplines of all. This is probably because this discipline has helped answer some of the most perplexing questions about human behaviour. In this post, we will discuss a number of operant conditioning examples in detail to explain the concept better. What is Operant Conditioning? Coined by behaviourist B.F Skinner, operant conditioning is also popularly known as Skinnerian conditioning. Operant conditioning is a way of learning that is made possible using punishments and rewards for behaviour. In simpler words, operant conditioning allows humans to create an association between a behaviour and its consequence. Skinner believed that humans should look at observable, external causes behind human behaviour instead of only focusing on internal motivations. The behaviourist classified responses into three different types: Reinforcers: This kind of response…